Noncredit graduate level courses focus on teaching service learning

Jill Grose (left) and Gail Cook will teach two non-credit graduate level courses that focus on teaching and service learning. The Faculty of Graduate Studies and the Centre for Pedagogical Innovation (CPI) will offer two non-credit graduate level courses, one focusing on teaching and the other on service-learning, through the fall and winter terms.The Theory and Practice of University Teaching (GRST 5N01) and The Theory and Practice of Service-Learning (GRST 5N02) will start in September. Registration for courses opens July 7. For information on how to register for the courses, students should contact Lorraine Sciamonte at x3239.This is the second year for GRST 5N01, while GRST 5N02 is being offered for the first time and represents a commitment to continued collaboration on course development between FGS and CPI.“Our partnership with CPI is allowing the Faculty to create courses that combine academic study and practical training in areas of teaching and learning as a way to augment their discipline-specific program experiences at Brock,” says Mike Plyley, Dean, Faculty of Graduate Studies. “We want to offer graduate students from across all 44 graduate programs as many opportunities as possible to develop essential competencies and professional skills that are in demand by employers.”Prof. Gail Lynn Cook of the Goodman School of Business and CPI’s faculty associate for service-learning will teach the new service-learning course (GRST 5N02) that focuses on academic study, community involvement and critical reflection.Cook has a rich academic background in integrating service-learning components into graduate and undergraduate courses.“One of the best things about the course is that it offers equal value to graduate students regardless of previous community activities,” she says. “Some will see this course as an entrée to service-learning and others, who have been engaged in the community through volunteer activities and program opportunities, can build on their experiences. It fills a gap in programming for graduate students interested in the theory, practice and reflection of community engagement.”Graduate students who complete 5N02 will be given a formal transcript notation that documents their participation in a service-learning course.“The course responds to a growing recognition about the importance of graduate students acquiring experience in community settings,” says Plyley. “That is specifically articulated in Brock’s strategic mandate agreement. As well, external bodies, such as the Council for Graduate Studies, the Higher Education Quality Council of Ontario and the Conference Board of Canada, have emphasized the value for graduate students to develop transferrable skills for the workplace through community outreach.”The teaching course (GRST 5N01) returns after its very successful introduction last year. CPI director Jill Grose says student feedback to the course has been very positive.“Students from last year describe the course as offering a collaborative environment that created a safe place to practise and develop their teaching,” says Grose. “They also remarked on how the range of resources and learning activities within the course helped them to reflect theoretically and practically on their roles as teachers.”The Theory and Practice of Service-Learning (GRST 5N02)Instructor: Prof. Gail Lynn CookCommences: Tuesday, Sept. 9, 9:30 to 12 noon, TH253 e-classroom (classes continue every second week)The non-credit course provides an opportunity for graduate students to join together in discussions about the value and implementation of service-learning in our lives.Students will:• identify the theoretical perspectives that position community-based experiences within the service learning literature• share approaches, strategies and best practices with a cohort of graduate students from multiple disciplines and perspectives• participate in active service learning projects within the community• describe, verbally and in writing, the transferrable skills/competencies acquired through the service learning involvement such as teamwork, problem solving, communication and leadershipThe Theory and Practice of University Teaching (GRST 5N01)Instructors: Jill Grose and Lianne Fisher, CPICommences: Tuesday, Sept. 16, 2 p.m. to 4:30 p.m., TH253 e-classroom (classes continue every second week)The non-credit course explores the theories and practices of teaching in the post-secondary environment. Students will engage in experiential approaches to course planning, instructional methods, evaluation and assessment, and reflective practice.Students will:• identify and connect major theoretical perspectives in instructional design, student learning, assessment, and reflective practice• practice instructional and presentation skills in micro teaching sessions• identify and develop formative and summative assessment strategies• practice skills in giving and receiving feedback• write a statement of teaching philosophy• create a teaching dossier representing significant teaching experiences and growth read more

Volvo CE breaks ground on new Russian excavator facility

first_imgA ground breaking ceremony attended by high profile dignitaries on April 18 marked the start of construction on Volvo’s SEK350 million excavator factory, underscoring the company’s commitment to the Russian market.The new plant is being built in Kaluga – 150 km southwest of Moscow – and will be Volvo’s seventh excavator manufacturing facility (of a total of 16 plants globally). Building has begun on the 15 ha plot and, when completed, the final manufacturing area will be 20,660 m2. Six models of excavators are planned to be made at the plan ranging from the 20 t EC200 to the 48 t EC480. New Russian dealer Ferronordic Machines has an ambitious investment and expansion program that will see numbers of branches swell to some 100 locations by 2015 (up from today’s 55) and workforce more than double to around 1,000 people in the same timescale. The first machines are due off the assembly lines in 2013, creating 280 new jobs in the process. While these excavator models are mainly used in the construction and quarrying industry, they are also employed in mining applications such as smaller gold operations – both for selective ore mining, as well as host machines for breaker attachments. They have also been delivered to Russian coal operations. This year, Ferronordic delivered a Volvo EC460B excavator to Yakutugol, which will be used for coal loadnig at its Dzhebariki-Khaya mine.“This is a considerable investment and underscores Volvo’s confidence in – and commitment to – the Russian economy,” commented the company’s President Pat Olney. “Excavators are a key product in this rapidly developing market and customers in Russia have a high regard for the Volvo brand and for the fuel efficiency, reliability and performance of our machines. This investment also demonstrates our strategy of, where possible, manufacturing goods close to where our customers are located.”“This is the first completely new plant Volvo CE has built for quite a while,” said Carl Slotte, Vice-President of the company’s activities in northern Europe. “Starting with a clean sheet of paper gives us the opportunity to create an advanced manufacturing site that incorporates innovative technologies and designs. It will be built in close compliance with our performance and environmental requirements.” Volvo CE states that it is a leading player in the Russian market today, and plans to double sales in the country by 2015. Excavator manufacturing in Kaluga will play an important role in achieving this goal. The second important success factor will be developing a distribution network.last_img read more