MH370: Searchers confident it will be found!

first_imgThe Australian led international team looking for MH370 is confident that it will be found within the next year.Yesterday Martin Dolan Chief Commissioner of the Australian Transport Safety Bureau told the UK’s Express that he is confident the wreckage will be found soon.MH370 went missing on March 8 last year with 239 passengers and crew aboard on a flight from Kuala Lumpur to Beijing on March 8 last year.However despite the most expensive and comprehensive search in aviation history no trace has been found of the Boeing 777.“Once we started looking and defining the search area, it became quite clear it could take up to two years,” Mr Dolan told Express.“We still remain confident it will be found in the next year and all the analysis we have puts the aircraft somewhere in that large search area.”Mr Dolan said that there is “no more information that would allow us to calculate a different area and governments accept that.”Almost half of the 120,000sq km area has been searched so far with the expectation that it will take another 12 months to complete the task.Mr Dolan rejects all the rumours saying that “all the information we have puts the aircraft in this defined search area.”“The crews and equipment being used are excellent and the data we’re receiving is of a quality beyond the specifications yet.“If we have to search the entire area, it will be completed this time next year but we expect to find the aircraft before then.”The primary countries involved and or funding the search are Australia, Malaysia and China, although the UK, USA, France and The Netherlands are technical contributors.MH370: Pilot knows where it isMH370: Only human inputlast_img read more

Hurriyat leader targets Army chief

first_imgHurriyat chairman Syed Ali Shah Geelani on Tuesday described the recent statements of the Chief of the Army Staff, General Bipin Rawat, on Kashmir as an “illustration of a criminal and fascist mentality”.“The statements only exposed the Army’s intentions. It testifies our claim that security forces are given a free licence to carry out genocide in Jammu and Kashmir with impunity,” said 86-year-old Mr. Geelani, who remains under house arrest.Gen. Rawat had backed Major Leetul Gogoi’s decision to tie a civilian to a jeep, saying a “dirty war has to be fought with innovative ways. For seven decades, we have time and again raised our voice and expressed our concern about the sinister plans of the Indian leadership in Kashmir. However, no serious steps were taken by international community,” said Mr. Geelani.The Jamaat-e-Islami expressed concern over the “threatening and intimidating” statements of General Rawat.last_img

Parrikar vows to make Goa a scientific hub

first_imgGoa Chief Minister Manohar Parrikar on Thursday said that the State government was working on making Goa a scientific hub in India.After inaugurating the Nobel Prize lecture series in the city on Thursday, Mr. Parrikar said, “Our government seeks to reinforce Goa’s status as India’s scientific hub. The focus will be on significantly strengthening scientific education and promoting scientific temperament in the State.”Mr. Parrikar announced an annual innovation science contest where high school and college students in the State would be invited to propose breakthrough research ideas. He said, “We seek to develop the capacity of our human capital, the most precious resource into a knowledge powerhouse that fuels our nation’s growth and addresses our most critical development issues through innovation. Our government will support innovations for a period of one year.”Earlier, Mr. Parikkar inaugurated the 2nd edition of Nobel Prize Series India 2018 with the theme, Science Impact Lives, and the Nobel Science Exhibition and the India Science Exhibition: Ideas Changes the World.The event is organised by the Department of Biotechnology of the Ministry of Science and Technology in collaboration with Nobel Media AB Sweden, the Nobel Museum and the Goa government.Secretary of Department of Bio-Technology K. Vijayaraghvan, Nobel Media CEO Dr. Mathias Fyrenius, Director of the Nobel Museum Dr. Olov Amelin, Consul General of Sweden for Mumbai Ulrika Sundberg, and Nobel laureates Christiane Nusslein-Volhard, Serge Haroche, Richard J. Roberts, Tomas Lindahl were present.‘Be curious, ask questions’Prof. Volhard said that science is meant to improve humankind’s progress and encourage basic research. She said, “Basic research is not directly aimed at discovery but to understand complications.” Prof. Volhard said that she was currently working on fish and their patterns and colours. She urged students to be curious, ask questions and discover things to help humankind.The Nobel series is the beginning of a five-day programme across Goa, Mumbai, and Delhi to stimulate engagement in science and literature. The Nobel laureates will deliver lectures and take part in roundtable discussions and meetings with experts and students. A conference for students will take place in Goa and a national session will be hosted by President Ram Nath Kovind at Rashtrapati Bhavan in New Delhi.The exhibition will be open to the public from Friday and continue till February 25. It is a unique opportunity to learn about the life of Alfred Nobel, view actual objects belonging to Nobel laureates and see how Nobel Prize-winning discoveries will affect the future.On Friday, the Nobel laureates will attend Nobel Dialogues, an interaction with students and teachers from schools, colleges and Kala Academy. On Saturday, they will have dialogues with scientists from the National Institute of Oceanography at Dona Paula.last_img read more

Monkeys Can Do Math

first_imgIt looks like a standardized test question: Is the sum of two numbers on the left or the single number on the right larger? Rhesus macaques that have been trained to associate numerical values with symbols can get the answer right, even if they haven’t passed a math class. The finding doesn’t just reveal a hidden talent of the animals—it also helps show how the mammalian brain encodes the values of numbers.Previous research has shown that chimpanzees can add single-digit numbers. But scientists haven’t explained exactly how, in the human or the monkey brain, numbers are being represented or this addition is being carried out. Now, a new study helps begin to answer those questions.Neurobiologist Margaret Livingstone of Harvard Medical School in Boston and her colleagues had already taught three rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta) in the lab to associate the Arabic numbers 0 through 9 and 15 select letters with the values zero through 25. When given the choice between two symbols, monkeys reliably chose the larger to get a correspondingly larger number of droplets of water, apple juice, or orange soda as a reward. To test whether the monkeys could add these values, the researchers began giving them a choice between a sum and a single symbol rather than two single symbols. Within 4 months, the monkeys had learned how the task worked and were able to effectively add two symbols and compare the sum to a third, single symbol.Sign up for our daily newsletterGet more great content like this delivered right to you!Country *AfghanistanAland IslandsAlbaniaAlgeriaAndorraAngolaAnguillaAntarcticaAntigua and BarbudaArgentinaArmeniaArubaAustraliaAustriaAzerbaijanBahamasBahrainBangladeshBarbadosBelarusBelgiumBelizeBeninBermudaBhutanBolivia, Plurinational State ofBonaire, Sint Eustatius and SabaBosnia and HerzegovinaBotswanaBouvet IslandBrazilBritish Indian Ocean TerritoryBrunei DarussalamBulgariaBurkina FasoBurundiCambodiaCameroonCanadaCape VerdeCayman IslandsCentral African RepublicChadChileChinaChristmas IslandCocos (Keeling) IslandsColombiaComorosCongoCongo, The Democratic Republic of theCook IslandsCosta RicaCote D’IvoireCroatiaCubaCuraçaoCyprusCzech RepublicDenmarkDjiboutiDominicaDominican RepublicEcuadorEgyptEl SalvadorEquatorial GuineaEritreaEstoniaEthiopiaFalkland Islands (Malvinas)Faroe IslandsFijiFinlandFranceFrench GuianaFrench PolynesiaFrench Southern TerritoriesGabonGambiaGeorgiaGermanyGhanaGibraltarGreeceGreenlandGrenadaGuadeloupeGuatemalaGuernseyGuineaGuinea-BissauGuyanaHaitiHeard Island and Mcdonald IslandsHoly See (Vatican City State)HondurasHong KongHungaryIcelandIndiaIndonesiaIran, Islamic Republic ofIraqIrelandIsle of ManIsraelItalyJamaicaJapanJerseyJordanKazakhstanKenyaKiribatiKorea, Democratic People’s Republic ofKorea, Republic ofKuwaitKyrgyzstanLao People’s Democratic RepublicLatviaLebanonLesothoLiberiaLibyan Arab JamahiriyaLiechtensteinLithuaniaLuxembourgMacaoMacedonia, The Former Yugoslav Republic ofMadagascarMalawiMalaysiaMaldivesMaliMaltaMartiniqueMauritaniaMauritiusMayotteMexicoMoldova, Republic ofMonacoMongoliaMontenegroMontserratMoroccoMozambiqueMyanmarNamibiaNauruNepalNetherlandsNew CaledoniaNew ZealandNicaraguaNigerNigeriaNiueNorfolk IslandNorwayOmanPakistanPalestinianPanamaPapua New GuineaParaguayPeruPhilippinesPitcairnPolandPortugalQatarReunionRomaniaRussian FederationRWANDASaint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da CunhaSaint Kitts and NevisSaint LuciaSaint Martin (French part)Saint Pierre and MiquelonSaint Vincent and the GrenadinesSamoaSan MarinoSao Tome and PrincipeSaudi ArabiaSenegalSerbiaSeychellesSierra LeoneSingaporeSint Maarten (Dutch part)SlovakiaSloveniaSolomon IslandsSomaliaSouth AfricaSouth Georgia and the South Sandwich IslandsSouth SudanSpainSri LankaSudanSurinameSvalbard and Jan MayenSwazilandSwedenSwitzerlandSyrian Arab RepublicTaiwanTajikistanTanzania, United Republic ofThailandTimor-LesteTogoTokelauTongaTrinidad and TobagoTunisiaTurkeyTurkmenistanTurks and Caicos IslandsTuvaluUgandaUkraineUnited Arab EmiratesUnited KingdomUnited StatesUruguayUzbekistanVanuatuVenezuela, Bolivarian Republic ofVietnamVirgin Islands, BritishWallis and FutunaWestern SaharaYemenZambiaZimbabweI also wish to receive emails from AAAS/Science and Science advertisers, including information on products, services and special offers which may include but are not limited to news, careers information & upcoming events.Required fields are included by an asterisk(*)To ensure that the monkeys hadn’t simply memorized every possible combination of symbols and associated a value with the combination—this wouldn’t be true addition—Livingstone’s team next taught the animals an entirely new set of symbols—Tetris-like blocks rather than letters and numbers. With the new symbols, the monkeys were again able to add—this time calculating the value of combinations they’d never seen before and confirming the ability to do basic addition, the team reports online today in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.But when Livingstone and colleagues started analyzing the data in more detail—they had the results of hundreds of tests per day for months on end—they realized that the monkeys weren’t 100% accurate. They tended to underestimate a sum compared with a single symbol when the two were close in value—sometimes choosing, for example, a 13 over the sum of eight and six. The underestimation was systematic—when adding two numbers, the monkeys always paid attention to the larger of the two, and then added only a fraction of the smaller number to it. The monkeys’ systematic errors argue against one theory of how the mammalian brain processes numbers. “What they’re doing is paying more attention to the big number than the little one,” Livingstone explains. But the altered values weren’t tied intrinsically to the symbols. If eight was the larger of two numbers in a sum, then its full value was considered, but if it was being added to a larger number, its value was diminished. One prevailing theory on number representation—dubbed logarithmic encoding—had proposed that the brain always underestimates the value of larger numbers in a systematic and unchangeable way. In such a case, the value of eight wouldn’t vary based on the situation as Livingstone observed.“They’ve shown that it’s very unlikely that there’s some kind of logarithmic encoding of numbers,” says psychologist David Burr of the University of Florence in Italy, who was not involved in the new work. Further research on how humans and monkeys estimate the value of numbers, and how this plays a role in the brain’s ability to add two values, could shed light on dyscalculia—a human learning disability specific to mathematics. Children with dyscalculia often have trouble not only adding numbers, but quickly guessing how many objects are in a group. Together with the new results on rhesus macaques, this suggests that estimating values is key to the ability to add.“Being able to estimate obviously has survival value; you want to be able to glance up and see how many lions are about to attack you,” Burr says. “The remaining goal is developing a model to explain how that happens in the brain.”last_img read more

Don’t Bar Old Folks From Clinical Trials, Researchers Argue

first_imgAn opinion column in today’s issue of The New York Times tackles a long-standing tension in the clinical trial world: the reluctance to include older subjects, even though they’re most of the population taking medications. Trials routinely bar senior citizens from their ranks, in part because researchers and drug regulators worry that the older you are, the more likely you are to have complicated health conditions that make testing new drugs more challenging. The opinion piece cites a paper published in The Journal of the American Medical Association back in 2007, which found that nearly 40% of trials in big-name journals between 1994 and 2006 excluded people over 65.It’s time for the system to change, the authors say. “Older Americans are our patients, too. We can’t leave them out,” write physician Donna Zulman and psychologist Keith Humphreys, who work at Stanford University School of Medicine in California and the Veterans Affairs health care system. Extrapolating results from young individuals to older ones is dicey, because biology shifts with age. Furthermore, “advanced age is not a reliable proxy for poor health,” Zulman and Humphreys argue. Researchers can still exclude trial volunteers if they have certain health conditions—but “not on their age alone.”Sign up for our daily newsletterGet more great content like this delivered right to you!Country *AfghanistanAland IslandsAlbaniaAlgeriaAndorraAngolaAnguillaAntarcticaAntigua and BarbudaArgentinaArmeniaArubaAustraliaAustriaAzerbaijanBahamasBahrainBangladeshBarbadosBelarusBelgiumBelizeBeninBermudaBhutanBolivia, Plurinational State ofBonaire, Sint Eustatius and SabaBosnia and HerzegovinaBotswanaBouvet IslandBrazilBritish Indian Ocean TerritoryBrunei DarussalamBulgariaBurkina FasoBurundiCambodiaCameroonCanadaCape VerdeCayman IslandsCentral African RepublicChadChileChinaChristmas IslandCocos (Keeling) IslandsColombiaComorosCongoCongo, The Democratic Republic of theCook IslandsCosta RicaCote D’IvoireCroatiaCubaCuraçaoCyprusCzech RepublicDenmarkDjiboutiDominicaDominican RepublicEcuadorEgyptEl SalvadorEquatorial GuineaEritreaEstoniaEthiopiaFalkland Islands (Malvinas)Faroe IslandsFijiFinlandFranceFrench GuianaFrench PolynesiaFrench Southern TerritoriesGabonGambiaGeorgiaGermanyGhanaGibraltarGreeceGreenlandGrenadaGuadeloupeGuatemalaGuernseyGuineaGuinea-BissauGuyanaHaitiHeard Island and Mcdonald IslandsHoly See (Vatican City State)HondurasHong KongHungaryIcelandIndiaIndonesiaIran, Islamic Republic ofIraqIrelandIsle of ManIsraelItalyJamaicaJapanJerseyJordanKazakhstanKenyaKiribatiKorea, Democratic People’s Republic ofKorea, Republic ofKuwaitKyrgyzstanLao People’s Democratic RepublicLatviaLebanonLesothoLiberiaLibyan Arab JamahiriyaLiechtensteinLithuaniaLuxembourgMacaoMacedonia, The Former Yugoslav Republic ofMadagascarMalawiMalaysiaMaldivesMaliMaltaMartiniqueMauritaniaMauritiusMayotteMexicoMoldova, Republic ofMonacoMongoliaMontenegroMontserratMoroccoMozambiqueMyanmarNamibiaNauruNepalNetherlandsNew CaledoniaNew ZealandNicaraguaNigerNigeriaNiueNorfolk IslandNorwayOmanPakistanPalestinianPanamaPapua New GuineaParaguayPeruPhilippinesPitcairnPolandPortugalQatarReunionRomaniaRussian FederationRWANDASaint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da CunhaSaint Kitts and NevisSaint LuciaSaint Martin (French part)Saint Pierre and MiquelonSaint Vincent and the GrenadinesSamoaSan MarinoSao Tome and PrincipeSaudi ArabiaSenegalSerbiaSeychellesSierra LeoneSingaporeSint Maarten (Dutch part)SlovakiaSloveniaSolomon IslandsSomaliaSouth AfricaSouth Georgia and the South Sandwich IslandsSouth SudanSpainSri LankaSudanSurinameSvalbard and Jan MayenSwazilandSwedenSwitzerlandSyrian Arab RepublicTaiwanTajikistanTanzania, United Republic ofThailandTimor-LesteTogoTokelauTongaTrinidad and TobagoTunisiaTurkeyTurkmenistanTurks and Caicos IslandsTuvaluUgandaUkraineUnited Arab EmiratesUnited KingdomUnited StatesUruguayUzbekistanVanuatuVenezuela, Bolivarian Republic ofVietnamVirgin Islands, BritishWallis and FutunaWestern SaharaYemenZambiaZimbabweI also wish to receive emails from AAAS/Science and Science advertisers, including information on products, services and special offers which may include but are not limited to news, careers information & upcoming events.Required fields are included by an asterisk(*)last_img read more

SPORT-OPEN 2 LAST

first_imgDjokovic has a 23-2 career stranglehold on Berdych who Djokovic has a 23-2 career stranglehold on Berdych who will be playing in his third Roland Garros quarter-final. It will be the top seeds 28th consecutive Grand Slam quarter-final and 36th in all. Djokovic also crossed the $100 million prize money barrier on Wednesday. He started the tournament with $99,673,404 and the 294,000 euros ($328,303) he earned by beating Bautista Agut took him past the landmark figure. Djokovic, seeking a first French Open title to complete a career Grand Slam, was 4-1 ahead of Bautista Agut in the third set Tuesday when play was halted. But the Serb quickly wrapped up the next two games Wednesday and despite falling a break down to trail 2-4 in the fourth, he stormed back to claim victory on a second match point. “With my coaching team, we had some tough talks on Tuesday night,” said Djokovic, who had struggled in the heavy conditions when he had uncharacteristically dropped serve five times. “But I came back with more intensity even though it was a tough mental and physical battle.” Austrias Dominic Thiem advanced to his maiden Grand Slam quarter-final with a 6-2, 6-7 (2/7), 6-1, 6-4 win over Spains Marcel Granollers. Granollers had made the last 16 without hitting a ball when nine-time champion Rafael Nadal withdrew with a wrist injury last week. Rain halted play at one set apiece on Tuesday, but 13th seed Thiem quickly found his groove on Wednesday to race through the third set before nailing down a place in the last eight. The 22-year-old will next meet Belgian 12th seed David Goffin who saw off Latvias Ernests Gulbis 4-6, 6-2, 6-2, 6-3 in another match held over from Tuesday. “We practise a lot together and hes also a very nice guy,” said Thiem, who trails Goffin 4-2 including a loss at the Australian Open this year. Goffin is only the second Belgian man to reach the last eight in Paris. AFP KHS KHSadvertisementlast_img read more

China asks US to play constructive role in SCS dispute

first_imgFrom K J M VarmaHangzhou, Sep 3 (PTI) Chinese President Xi Jinping today asked the US to “play a constructive role” in maintaining peace and stability in the disputed South China Sea, asserting that Beijing will “unswervingly” safeguard its sovereignty over the area.Xi made the remarks during a meeting with US President Barack Obama here on the eve of the key summit of G20 nations, where the leaders of the worlds 20 strong economies will meet.Xi said China will continue to “unswervingly safeguard” its territorial sovereignty and maritime rights and interests in the South China Sea (SCS).”In the meantime, China will stick to peaceful settlement of disputes through consultation and negotiation with parties directly concerned, and safeguard peace and stability in the South China Sea along with ASEAN member states,” Xi was quoted as saying by state-run Xinhua news agency.After several hours of talks, the White House said the leaders had a “candid exchange” over the arbitration case between China and the Philippines.Obama also told Xi that the US would keep monitoring Chinas commitments on cybersecurity, the White House said.In the meeting, Xi also said that China is willing to work with the US to ensure bilateral ties stay on the right track.He urged the two countries to follow the principles of non-conflict, non-confrontation, mutual respect and win-win cooperation, deepen mutual trust and collaboration, and manage and control their differences in a constructive manner, in order to push forward continuous, sound and stable development of bilateral ties.advertisementNoting that the city of Hangzhou holds historic significance to Sino-US relations, Xi spoke highly of his previous meetings with Obama since 2013, which “produced important consensus.”The US has voiced concern over Beijings growing assertiveness in key waterways in the region.The US has urged China to accept an international arbitration panels ruling that sided with the Philippines in a dispute over claims in the SCS.Beijing claims almost all of the South China Sea despite partial counter-claims from the Philippines, Vietnam, Malaysia and Taiwan. PTI KJV PMSlast_img read more

Mexican player banned for six months for match-fixing

first_imgMexican tennis player Daniel Garza has been suspended for six months and fined $5,000 after being found guilty of match-fixing, the Tennis Integrity Unit said on Tuesday.The 31-year-old, ranked 1,065th in singles, had attempted to influence the outcome of a match at an ITF Futures tournament at Calabasas, California, in March 2015, the sport’s corruption watchdog said.The case, based on a TIU investigation, was heard in Miami last month.Garza, who achieved a career-high ranking of 294 in 2012, was banned with immediate effect, the TIU said in a statement.World tennis was rocked in January by allegations that the game’s authorities had failed to deal with widespread match-fixing in the sport.The authorities rejected media reports that 16 players who have been ranked in the top 50 had been repeatedly flagged to the TIU over suspicions they had thrown matches in the past decade.A number of corruption-related cases have since come to light.Three Italian players were banned by their national tennis federation in July for their roles in attempting to fix matches.The sanctions came days after the European Sports Security Association said that tennis accounted for the majority of suspicious betting activity it had flagged, with 34 incidents in the second quarter of 2016.last_img read more

CBI books SAI Deputy Director in graft case after sting op

first_imgNew Delhi, Aug 12 (PTI) The deputy director of Sports Authority of India (SAI) has been booked by the CBI for allegedly receiving a bribe of Rs one lakh from a news reporter in a sting operation, in return for providing imported weapons and facilities at a shooting range.The case has been registered on a complaint from the chief vigilance officer of SAI that a reporter of a Hindi news channel had carried out a sting operation aired on July 17, 2016.Shiv Dutt Bakshi, who was then administrator of the Karni Singh Shooting Range, was allegedly seen accepting the bribe and a liquor bottle from the reporter in lieu of providing shooting facilities at the range and procuring imported weapons illegally for him at low rates by flouting and manipulating rules, the FIR alleged.The SAI vigilance officer had collected the tapes from the channel purportedly showing that Bakshi was prepared to provide the reporter with a Walther rifle and allow its usage even though the journalist did not have an arms licence.”The transcription of the DVD clearly shows the conversation of the reporter and Bakshi (who) accepted liquor in a form of quid pro quo to help the reporter in getting the gun in an illegal manner,” the complaint alleged. PTI ABS KUNlast_img read more