Canal & River Trust Unveils Dredging Plans for 2019-20

first_imgThe Canal & River Trust (CRT) is spending £8 million on dredging in the financial year 2019-20 to help keep the waterways navigable for boaters.According to the Trust, the comprehensive program covers locations identified by boaters, as well as the places that need dredging every year.The Trust will be carrying out dredging work on the following canals over the next year: Oxford Canal; Grand Union Canal; Macclesfield Canal; Monmouthshire & Brecon Canal; Coventry Canal; Worcester & Birmingham Canal; Llangollen Canal; and Chesterfield Canal.Annual maintenance dredging will take place on the River Weaver, the Ribble Link, the River Severn and the Gloucester & Sharpness Canal, and throughout the Yorkshire and North East region.The Trust will also be clearing the River Thames approach to West India Dock, the River Mersey approach to Canning Half Tide Dock, and lock approaches on the River Trent.Additionally, the Trust will continue to evaluate the needs of the whole network and in some cases the projects may change.last_img read more

“Death coaching”: The slippery slope of decriminalising euthanasia

first_imgThe Australian News 25 July 2014THE term “death coaching” is how Judi Taylor describes the tragic suicide of her 26-year-old son Lucas in a deserted park in Germany.  “It was death-coaching, not life coaching, that killed him,” says the Melbourne mother of three sons. Lucas, a talented linguist, ended his life after taking a ¬euthanasia drug he had bought in Peru. Judi Taylor says her son’s every step and every instruction — and strong encouragement — came from a Peaceful Pill online forum run by Exit International, the pro-euthanasia lobby group run by now-suspended medical practitioner Philip Nitschke.Dr Nitschke has declared he will mount an appeal after being suspended by the Medical Board of Australia following his admission he supported 45-year-old Perth man Nigel Brayley in his ¬decision to commit suicide, despite knowing he was not terminally ill. He will be suspended until the end of September pending further investigation by the board.BeyondBlue chairman Jeff Kennett yesterday welcomed the decision, saying “We cannot allow the debate to start that it’s all right for a 16 year old — or a 45 year old — simply because they’re having an off day to attempt to take their own life.”It was a secretive world that Judi Taylor discovered only after his death, when she and her ¬remaining sons hacked into his computer, found his Peaceful Pill forum password and began reading a bizarre and grim litany of ¬online conversations. “There seemed to be hundreds of people busy talking to each other about the best methods to commit suicide,” she says. “Lucas mentioned in his posts that he’d learned about importing illegal drugs and what airports to use. One person would say: ‘Oh, Nembutal’s the way to go.’ They’d discuss whether the best place to go was China or Peru. “It seemed to be peer-to-peer communication, and in all the hundreds of messages nobody was saying they had a terminal illness … What Lucas definitely said was ‘I’m not sick yet’ and ‘I’m quite able-bodied’.” There were even messages to Lucas from a “moderator” Mrs Taylor describes as calling himself Doctor Ted. “He seemed to come in when a medical query needed answering.” He told Lucas ‘because of your weight, you’ll be needing this much Nembutal’.” The mother, who had spoken regularly to her son overseas via Skype — and had seen no outwards signs of depression — could barely believe what she was reading, for hours online, tracking his methodical “coaching” descent towards suicide.…The suspension of Dr Nitschke’s licence was welcomed by South Australian Health Minister Jack Snelling and AMA branches in Western and South Australia, where Dr Nitschke first registered. WA AMA vice-president Andrew Miller said: “Our profession is relieved to be rid of him and wish to assure the community we will always help those with treatable illnesses to recover and live.”Mr Snelling said he wanted to ensure “Dr Nitschke and his abhorrent views aren’t being practised in a medical context here in South Australia’’.http://www.theaustralian.com.au/news/health-science/death-coaching-a-mourning-mothers-rage-at-sons-assisted-exit/story-e6frg8y6-1227000811812?nk=0b1b5f52cd5754b15b2168bac30270d6#last_img read more

He performed 1,200 abortions. Watch animations of the procedure.

first_imgLifeSiteNews 24 February 2016Family First Comment: This former abortionist wants you to see what abortion really looks like“Although the website eschews the use of gore or “graphic images,” Lila Rose said she believes depictions of aborted children can help end abortion, something she likens to the abolitionist movement’s use of images of overstuffed ships crossing raging seas during the Trans-Atlantic slave trade.”“I came to realize that killing a baby at any stage is wrong. I want you to know today, no matter where you’re at or what you’ve done, you can change.” – former abortionist Dr. Anthony LevatinoLila Rose believes if Americans had to face the reality of abortion, they would become pro-life overnight. She announced last night that she has teamed up with former abortionist Dr. Anthony Levatino to launch a new website bringing the medical facts of how abortions take place to every American.AbortionProcedures.com, which went online this morning, is precisely what it says it is. The new website features Dr. Levatino, who has performed more than 1,200 abortions, describing the most common methods of abortion as each one is depicted in animation.“These videos were peer reviewed by doctors and medical professionals,” Lila Rose told LifeSiteNews during a call last night.Each of the videos lasts three to four minutes and details the facts of the procedure and the medical risks associated with them.In all, he describes four methods of abortion:•Medical abortion – the use of RU-486 during the earliest stages of pregnancy;•Aspiration (suction) abortion – the most common form of abortion, used during the first 12 weeks, especially 6-12 weeks of pregnancy;•Dismemberment (dilation and extraction, or D&E) abortion – the most common form of abortion during the second trimester, in which the child is torn apart one limb at a time. Dr. Levatino practiced this method up to 24 weeks, although he said it is sometimes performed later; and•Induction abortion – the method used during the third trimester, in which the child is injected with Digoxin, then delivered stillborn – or occasionally, alive.READ MORE: https://www.lifesitenews.com/news/he-performed-1200-abortions.-in-new-videos-he-wants-you-to-see-what-abortio?utm_source=LifePetitions+petition+signers&utm_campaign=8f621fe0bc-Update_to_pro_family_list2_26_2016&utm_medium=email&utm_term=0_c5c75ce940-8f621fe0bc-398888013last_img read more

Double Rainbow Shines Over Sunman Tuesday

first_imgDouble rainbow over Sunman Tuesday. (Image: Amanda Richter)SUNMAN, Ind. – We hear Sunman is the place to be if you’re searching for a pot of gold.Amanda Richter captured a stunning photograph of this double rainbow in Sunman Tuesday night.Thanks Amanda!We’ve had storms moving through the region this week and occasional rain showers remain possible through Thursday morning.Dolly Parton may have said it best though, “The way I see it, if you want the rainbow, you gotta put up with the rain!”last_img

Southeast Indiana educator, bandleader dies

first_imgLawrenceburg, In. — Charles M. “Bud” Steuver, 89, of Aurora passed away Monday December 10, 2018 at Ridgewood Healthcare in Lawrenceburg.  He was born Thursday June 6, 1929 in Clay Township, Dearborn County, the son of William Leonard and Mildred Mary (Snyder) Steuver.  Charles graduated from Lawrenceburg High School and Indiana State University with a double major in music and history.  He started his teaching career in Dillsboro 1951-1956, as the band director and music teacher for all 12 grades. He then went to Danville, Indiana for 1 year and then was band director at Lawrenceburg High School until 1971.  At that time, he started teaching general education and social studies at the Aurora Jr. High School until his retirement in 1984.  Charles was an accomplished musician playing the alto, tenor, and baritone saxophones, along with the string bass and clarinet.  He played in both the Terre Haute and Indiana State University Symphonies.  He also had played in various dance bands in his early career.  In later years, he loved working on cars, camping, and traveling.  He enjoyed John Wayne movies and was a Civil War buff who enjoyed traveling to the locations of where the different battles had been fought. He also knew the history behind every one of those battles.  Charles was a member of the First Presbyterian Church at Aurora and was a former member of the Hopewell Presbyterian Church and Hopewell F&AM Masonic Lodge in Dillsboro.Survivors include daughter, Linda K. (Dennis) Schmidt of Bright, sons Douglas P. (Beverly) Steuver of Mustang, Oklahoma, Joseph W. Steuver of Beaver Creek, Ohio and Thomas A. (Lisa) Steuver of Bright, sister Elizabeth Ferber of Ft. Myers, Florida, grandchildren Nicholas, Jacob, Michelle, Olivia, Victoria and Charles Steuver, James Thatcher II, Jillian Brown, Jennifer Caldwell, Stephanie Carter, Stephen Thomas, Melissa Grijalva, Craig Schmidt, Tyler Schmidt, Chelsea Eckstein, 15 great grandchildren, and a host of friends and former students.A service celebrating his life will be 11AM Friday December 14, at Filter-DeVries-Moore Funeral Home in Dillsboro with Pastor Robert Northcutt officiating.  Burial will follow in Oakdale Cemetery at Dillsboro.  Family and Friends may gather to honor and remember Charles Thursday 5-8 PM also at the funeral home.  Memorials may be given in his memory to the First Presbyterian Church of Aurora or the Hopewell Presbyterian Church in Dillsboro. Filter-DeVries-Moore Funeral Home entrusted with arrangements, 12887 Lenover Street, Box 146, Dillsboro, Indiana 47018, (812)432-5480. You may go to filterdevriesmoorefuneralhome to leave an online condolence message for the family.last_img read more

Banned Tevez arrested by police

first_img The Argentinian star was banned by Manchester Magistrates in January after pleading guilty to two counts of failing to furnish information relating to incidents in which his Hummer vehicle was clocked speeding. He also admitted not having a proper UK driving licence. Tevez, who did not attend the hearing, denied through his solicitor that he was driving on two occasions when the car was caught speeding. The first offence took place in Morecambe, Lancashire, on March 28 – the night he played for City’s reserves against Morecambe reserves. The court heard the car was clocked doing 39mph in a 30mph zone and Tevez failed to respond to letters sent to him by police on April 3 and May 4. The second incident took place on May 8 when the car was seen at 66mph in a 50mph zone in Crewe, Cheshire, and he again failed to respond to letters from the police about it. The court was told he failed to respond because he did not recognise the word constabulary. His solicitor Gwyn Lewis told the hearing: “He does understand the word ‘police’, but not more complicated words. The letters are written from Cheshire Constabulary and the word police doesn’t appear on it anywhere.” Failing to provide identification carries six penalty points and under the totting up procedure he was disqualified. He was also ordered to pay a total in fines and costs of £1,540. Tevez was allegedly at the wheel of a white Porsche Cayenne when he was held by police on Thursday as a result of “information provided”. He was taken to a nearby police station for questioning before being bailed. No bail date has been released. The Manchester City striker, who was banned from driving for six months on January 16, was arrested on Thursday near his home in Alderley Edge, Cheshire. He was later bailed pending further inquiries. A spokeswoman for Cheshire Police said: “At 5.13pm yesterday police arrested a 29-year-old man from Alderley Edge on the A538 in Macclesfield. The man was arrested on suspicion of driving whilst disqualified and has since been released on police bail.” Press Associationcenter_img Footballer Carlos Tevez has been arrested on suspicion of driving whilst disqualified, police sources confirmed.last_img read more

Department issues warning about using improper gas containers

first_imgAs residents continue to rush to get last minute supplies for Hurricane Dorian, police officers would like to remind you that there is a proper and an improper way to get gas.The Highlands County Sheriff’s Office shared a photo of one way you should not get gas:While the department says they do not know where or when the photo was taken, they did say using a container not usually used to hold gas (such as the buckets shown in the picture,) is a bad idea not just because it is against the law, but because gas cans have special built-in features to prevent spills and prevent toxic fumes from being released into the air.  Though regular buckets may work to temporarily hold the gas, they do not have the same safety or handling features.last_img

Venus Hits Semis, First Time in 14 Years!

first_imgWilliams, the 13th seed, saw off 24th seed Pavlyuchenkova 6-4 7-6 (7-3) in the first of the quarter-finals.The 36-year-old American has never won the title, her best effort a runner-up finish to sister Serena in 2003.She goes on to face unseeded American Coco Vandeweghe, who thrashed Spain’s seventh seed Garbine Muguruza 6-4 6-0.Vandeweghe, 25, followed up her win over world number one and defending champion Angelique Kerber with a crushing defeat of French Open champion Muguruza.“I really wasn’t feeling all that great out there, I was feeling kind of nervous,” said Vandeweghe.“I just tried to play my best, stay within myself, keep my patterns. I fought through a few break points on her serve, kept on the pressure in the first set and then she finally cracked.“Once I got rolling in the second it was like a freight train. You couldn’t stop it.”Williams, meanwhile, dropped serve four times against Pavlyuchenkova but was much the stronger in the decisive moments, becoming the oldest woman to reach a Grand Slam semi-final since Martina Navratilova at Wimbledon in 1994.“I’m so excited. Today was such a hard-fought match. She never let up,” said the seven-time Grand Slam champion.“It’s wonderful to be here at the start of the year. I want to go further. I’m not happy with this.“I try to believe. Should I look across the net and believe the person across the net deserves it more?“This mentality is not how champions are made. I’d like to be a champion, in particular this year. The mentality I walk on court with is: I deserve this.”Today, Serena Williams will play Britain’s Johanna Konta at about 02:00 GMT, following the match between Czech fifth seed Karolina Plisokva and Croatia’s Mirjana Lucic-Baroni.Share this:FacebookRedditTwitterPrintPinterestEmailWhatsAppSkypeLinkedInTumblrPocketTelegram AUSTRALIAN OPENVenus Williams reached the Australian Open semi-finals for the first time in 14 years with a straight-set win over Russia’s Anastasia Pavlyuchenkova.last_img read more

Center for Artificial Intelligence forms new partnership with Microsoft

first_imgFlying across the horizons of African and Asian forests, drones created through a collaboration between the USC Center for Artificial Intelligence in Society and Microsoft operate with the intent of spotting poaching hunters. Lucas Joppa, chief enviornmental scientist for Microsoft research, spoke to students at the Center for Artificial Intelligence in Society. Photo courtesy of USC Center for Artificial Intelligence in Society.According to USC computer science professor Milind Tambe, poaching around the world is not easily detectable, but with recent advancements in artificial intelligence technology, wildlife conservation efforts are improving.USC CAIS announced that it is initiating a new collaboration with Microsoft in AI for Earth, a program intended to encourage AI wildlife conservation research and provide student internships, on Jan. 8. USC CAIS was founded in August 2016 by Tambe and Eric Rice, an associate professor of social work. According to Tambe, Microsoft and USC CAIS established research relations in the past for several years, and the collaboration has now escalated into a partnership. “What this partnership implies is that we have essentially supported summer research, so other researchers can participate on the conservation research that we have been doing here,” Tambe said. “So we are applying for summer fellowships for Ph.D. students, [postdoctoral students], assistant professors and there are postdoctoral research opportunities.”The Microsoft Green Blog stated that USC CAIS has done extensive collaboration with Microsoft on multiple environmental AI projects. Past projects included game theory research, machine learning and AI development to better wildlife conditions.One of the major focuses of this joint wildlife conservation effort involves poaching prevention. USC CAIS and Microsoft have expanded their AI implementations beyond local areas and into Africa and Asia. According to Tambe, SPOT, otherwise known as the Systematic Poacher Detector is one of many collaborations. This project flies video-taking drones in Africa to detect poaching activities in forests. These drones demonstrate the benefits of AI machines, since they use automatic detection instead of manual labor. “We can let appropriate authorities know that there are some people walking in the forest, who are not supposed to be there,” Tambe said. “That would allow us to intercept the poachers and stop them from getting into the park and hunting animals.”The Microsoft Green Blog also expressed interest in supporting early career research, building and maintaining canonical environmental datasets and translating findings to daily applications with USC researchers. Given that there is a high level of student interest in AI environmental conservation, CAIS aims to be more present at USC by publicizing the collaboration with Microsoft. CAIS plans to host more on-campus seminars for students with lectures given by speakers from Microsoft. Additionally, directors of the organization intend to visit Microsoft with students to conduct research firsthand. “Our students are so keen on this topic that we haven’t had an issue on trying to recruit people to do this work … [but] many students don’t know that this is going on,” Tambe said.last_img read more